How to Control Facebook Privacy Settings

How to Control Facebook Privacy Settings

With the rise of online shopping and user-generated content, online privacy issues have been thrust to the forefront of any discussion about social media and information sharing available on the Internet. Naturally, Facebook lies squarely at the center of controversy of the way social networks treat users’ personal information, even though it’s the actual users themselves who have decided to share it. Happily, as Facebook usage begins to feel more and more like a right and not a privilege for many, the company has taken many steps to allow users at least some semblance of control over the information they are sharing, even though that very information is the lifeblood of the company’s astronomical value.

The trouble: Many don’t realize how to control their Facebook privacy settings. So while you may choose to share daily status updates and a constant stream of photos and check-ins to your Facebook timeline every day, it’s important to remember: There are steps you can take to keep that information as private as you’d like it.  Here’s a look at the different ways you can control your personal privacy details, and which data you’re sharing with strangers.  Some of these tools are pretty straightforward, but others contain Inception-like layers of settings within settings that can make it difficult to find the precise on/off switch you’re seeking unless you know exactly what it is you’re looking for.

To begin, access the “Privacy Settings” menu from the top right of your Timeline.

Facebook Privacy Settings: Controlling When You Post

You may not realize it, but you can control who can see your status updates, photos, check-ins and other information when you post.  There’s an option within every post to allow you to control this flow, unless you’re using certain apps like Facebook for Blackberry devices. Within the Privacy Settings menu, you can set your default settings for each of the different updates to be seen by friends, the public, or only me.  This is the most basic level of Privacy Setting available, and one to which most are already attuned to.

 Connections With Others

In the “How You Connect” section, you can control your settings for how you can be found, who is allowed to send you friend requests and who can send you messages.  Decide if you want everyone to do these actions, or just limit them to friends of friends.  In the case of receiving messages, many also limit that to just friends and direct connections as well. 

Being Tagged

In the “Profile and Tagging” section of Facebook’s privacy settings, you control information that others can post using your profile.  The first basic selection controls whether you will allow others to post on your wall or not.  Most of the time, unless you’re a public figure, it’s fine to let others post on your wall, as the friends in your network are not likely to post something inappropriate.  But if you’re nervous about that happening, simply don’t allow others to post on your wall, and the only time anyone might complain about unwanted posts is on your birthday.

Privacy Settings also provide another layer of protection against those worried about posting material to their profile that they can’t control. If you still want to allow this activity, you can select to let no one see information others post except you, or you can make it visible to friends, friends of friends or everyone. You can also do the same for photos and check-ins you’re tagged in.

In this section, you also have a couple more options when it comes to how Facebook will treat and notify you when you’re tagged.  You can choose to approve any tags featuring you inserted by others, and also control whether Facebook’s facial recognition software can suggest you as a potential tag to your friends who are posting pictures.

Third Party Access – Ads, Apps and Websites

This section is at the crux of many of the privacy concerns when it comes to Facebook.  According to the company’s Privacy Settings page, “On Facebook, your name, profile picture, gender, networks, username and user id are always publicly available, including to apps.”  The reason for this, the company says, is to make this information more social.

Beyond that, you can control how all of your other information is shared with these third-party software programs, which is extremely important because they are made by separate entities that have different privacy policies than Facebook, and because it’s going to happen – these apps get access to information on users as well as information on THEIR FRIENDS whenever someone uses an app.  So it’s important you regulate what information can be shared, such as your bio, birthday, photos, status updates – pretty much anything you’ve updated on Facebook.  If you don’t want apps and websites to access these, you can uncheck them all, or even better turn of all games and apps.  The only drawback then is you can’t use any yourself, but surprisingly that is not that difficult for most.

In this section, you also control whether you carry your Facebook info with you when you visit other websites, and if you can see if your friends have done the same. Facebook calls this Instant Personalization.

It’s also within here that you can find a preview of your page as someone who is not friends with you who can see it.  It’s a good idea to check this out from time to time, especially if you’re trying to restrict the information you’re making publicly available.  Sometimes a tagged picture from a friend who has different privacy settings than you may make it through.

Past Posts

In this section, Facebook has made it really easy to change the privacy settings on all previous posts in one fell swoop.  If a change of heart or life event has made you suddenly become more private, this is a simple way to “lock down” everything instead of having to change the settings post by post.

Blocking

If someone is harassing you or you don’t want to be connected to them for some other reason, you can add them to your “Block” list, which prevents them from sending you Friend Requests or  app and event invites.  You can also block specific apps here, although it’s also easy to do these straight from your timeline so you know longer see invites from the latest ‘Ville game or SocialCam spam.

The Future of Video Games

The Future of Video Games

Game Theory

A smarter way to play: Video games industry analysis, reviews & insight.

 The video games industry is going through a period of radical change, thanks to the advent of mobile games, social games, free online games and more. While many exciting developments continue to happen on traditional systems such as the PlayStation 3, Wii, Xbox 360, Nintendo 3DS and PlayStation Vita, much more is going on in the world of free to play titles, iPhone and iPad apps, digital downloads and other arenas. Naturally, gaming insiders are working hard to adapt as Facebook games and zero-cost applications continues to take over – a topic we explore in the following video on the future of video games.

Looking for more information on where video games are headed in terms of both design and as a business? Check out Game Theory‘s website, chock full of articles, hints, tips, advice, news, trends and videos on the wild world of gaming.

How to Share Data Online

How to Share Data Online

Although it’s quaint to think of working together with someone online on a document or video project as something that can be done while sitting side by side on the same computer, most online collaboration involves the sharing of data and information across separate computers. And whether it’s a problem with large files or trying to decipher multiple edits being done in a parallel, the need for streamlined online file sharing is important for families, individuals and businesses. Thankfully, a number of apps, cloud computing solutions and Web services can teach you how to share data online in seconds flat.

Remember the old trick you used to use where you would e-mail yourself important documents prior to a presentation or meeting to make sure you could at least access them somewhere electronically should we need to make edits? There’s no need anymore, thanks to the rise of wireless networks, mobile devices and cloud services, which make the practice seem woefully outdated. Here are 7 better ways to share data online that don’t involve e-mail attachments.

  1. GoogleDocs All you need is a Google account, and you can collaborate on documents and spreadsheets in the cloud.  Google Docs eliminates worries over “version control” with quick, automatic saves that ensure that anytime anyone access the document, they’re seeing the most current version.  The main drawback with Google Docs is that the functionality of their document and spreadsheet programs is rather limited, although the service does a good job of providing basic functionality and similarity to Microsoft’s popular Office products.
  2. Microsoft Office Web Apps – Since many folks are most well-versed in Microsoft’s Excel, Word and PowerPoint programs, it’s great that the company has found a way to allow these to be shared online collaboratively.  Using only a Windows Live ID (and a valid license for Office products), you can store, edit and share your documents online the way they were created.
  3. Acrobat – Adobe’s file sharing solutions are less focused on group collaboration and more on interaction.  Although the firm does allow for manipulation of their proprietary .PDF docs, it also provides a robust suite of web forms, online signing apps and even large-file sharing services that make it simple to share data online.   Although each service does offer a free, limited trial, there are paid versions which allow for deeper and unlimited form creation and sharing.
  4. Dropnox – Dropbox allows users to upload large files and e-mail a link to others where they can download them, or collaborate and share using cloud folders whose contents synchronze across users’ desktops.  It offers a decent amount of space for free (2GB), with bonuses for referring new sign-ups.   Depending on your usage, you can update to 50GB or 100GB plans for around $100 per year or $200 year respectively, or choose a more serious, customizable option if your needs are greater than that.  Dropbox makes file sharing extremely simple, and doesn’t require passwords for your recipients to download.
  5. YouSendIt – A service that lets you upload large files then send them to coworkers and family members as simple web links. YouSendIt’s paid programs are more impressive than the free service, although if your file is less than 50MB big, then YouSendIt Lite is a nice version.  But for files larger than that, you’ll need to spend either $100 or $150 per year to receive greater storage, control over expiration dates, and even tracking results in the YouSendIt premium ProPlus package.
  6. Box.com – Box.com offers 5GB of free file storage, and offers a number of other user-friendly features, such as the ability to upload entire folders with of data and files at the same time. It also offers apps that are maximized for mobile devices, and provide online document collaboration as well.  This is a great solution for businesses large and small that need a common drive for their materials that can be accessed by many different people from many different locations.  Plans start at $15 per user per month, but the company also provides customizable options and quotes for businesses and users with greater needs.
  7.  Google Drive – Google is attempting to make “cloud storage” simple, easy and understandable for casual users with Google Drive.  Its simple drag and drop interface and connection to users’ Google e-mail accounts just may help them succeed.  It’s a great free option, with up to 5GB for free to store photos, resumes, school projects and more.