Find a Job Online: Top 5 Job Hunting Sites

Find a Job Online: Top 5 Job Hunting Sites

Psst… Looking for a job? You are? That’s not a surprise, given that the economy has been staggering around drunkenly since 2008. Sometimes it’s up, and sometimes it’s down. If you want to find what you’re looking for, you need every advantage you can get. That means some good old fashioned pavement-pounding, but you should also conduct a rigorous search online. And to do that, you should be aware of the best job hunting sites on the Internet. 

To help narrow down your search for decent job posting sites (because simply hunting for a job causes a lifetime of stress in itself), here are some resources that you should consider: 

TwitterWhile you should absolutely patronize websites that are dedicated wholly to job listings, you should also take care not to ignore social media outlets like Twitter. If you have your eye on a particular company, make sure you follow their Twitter account: you’re almost certain to stumble across job postings that won’t show up anywhere else. Likewise, find and follow accounts that post listings in your field(s) of interest. 

LinkedInIn the same vein, make sure you take a look at the job board at Linkedin. You can find exclusive postings, not to mention a supportive community that dispenses valuable job hunting advice. 

Indeed – Indeed is one of the hottest job sites on the Internet. You can sort through millions of job postings from thousands of companies. It sounds kind of intimidating because, frankly, it is. That’s why Indeed offers tips and advice to help you narrow down your search, and lets you set up job alerts that can be mailed to your inbox on a daily basis. Indeed! 

SimplyHiredSimplyHired pulls job listings from multiple sources, including company sites, job boards, newspapers, non-profit organizations, and others. SimplyHired allows for an easily-customizable job hunting experience: when you create an account, you can manage your searches, block certain companies from your search, and manage email alerts. SimplyHired is also a good tool for studying the job market (including trends, popular jobs, etc) in a specific location/city. 

MonsterMonster may not be “the” go-to site for job hunting anymore, but it still has clout. Companies certainly don’t overlook it when they’re ready to post a listing, so as far as volume is concerned, Monster still delivers a huge number of prospects. 

For more great suggestions for job hunting sites, visit: 

The 10 Best Job Search Websites at PCMag.com

The 10 Best Job Hunting Websites at DigitalTrends

Best Job Search Websites at About.com

How to Choose a Video Game Console

How to Choose a Video Game Console

Though buying a video game console may seem like an expensive purchase at first glance, it’s actually a great long-term entertainment solution for families. It’s an even better choice than ever, thanks to frequent price cuts and sales. But with so many systems to choose from, there are a few things to consider before buying a gaming system. Units currently on the market (e.g. the PlayStation 3, xbox 360, Wii, Nintendo DS/3DS and PlayStation Vita) offer a rich variety of content across multiple genres, including tons of educational and kid-friendly fare. Here’s what else you need to realize to successfully know how to buy a video game console.

There are lots of games for kids, but not everything is kid-friendly – Though video games are sometimes pigeonholed as a pastime for children, not all the software that’s for sale is appropriate for youngsters. Pay attention to the Electronics Software Rating Board (ESRB) rating on each game, and visit the ESRB’s website for detailed breakdowns of the potentially offensive content in each game. 

Most game consoles—including handheld game consoles, like the Nintendo 3DS and the PlayStation Vita—have parental controls that you can use to disallow children from playing games above a certain rating. With some parental control settings, you can also restrict the amount of time that your child is allowed to play. 

Some consoles sell add-on accessories that are ideal for family play—Microsoft’s Xbox 360 has a separate attachment called Kinect that allows you to play certain games using the motion of your whole body. It was engineered with families in mind, and there are lots of fun, kid-friendly games that utilize the accessory. You can buy the Kinect separately, though Microsoft also sells it as part of a bundle (a common industry practice which can provide cost savings when determining how to buy a video game console). 

The Wii is your cheapest console option, but has limited features – Nintendo found enormous success with its Wii console, thanks in no small part to the fact that the system is priced considerably lower than its direct competitors, the PlayStation 3 and the Xbox 360 (approximately $100 to $150 cheaper, depending on where you shop). That’s definitely something to keep in mind if you’re on a budget, though there are certain departments where the Wii is a little lacking. Its online features aren’t as robust as its competitors’, it doesn’t support HD graphic displays, and third-party support for the system isn’t very strong (“third parties” refer to game developers that aren’t Nintendo itself). The Wii might not be the best choice for a savvy game player who craves gameplay variety and/or a strong online presence, but the system still has wonderful games in many of Nintendo’s best-known franchises, including Super Mario, The Legend of Zelda, Kirby, Donkey Kong, and Metroid. Tablet-powered successor the Wii U will also be out by year-end (it’s backwards compatible with Wii games), which may affect your purchasing decision as well.

Game purchases don’t stop at retail, and some consoles have stronger online markets than others – Buying a video game no longer means trudging through the elements to reach a game store—not exclusively, anyway. Modern game consoles also offer a plethora of downloadable games, including brand new titles and some previously-released retro fare for anyone who’s nostalgic for the “good ol’ days” of gaming. The Wii has the Wii Shop Channel; the PlayStation 3 has the PlayStation Network (PSN); and the Xbox 360 has Xbox Live Arcade (XBLA). Again, each online market has its strengths and weaknesses. XBLA and PSN are great for downloading original games, but if you want to play all those awesome NES, SNES, and Nintendo 64 games that were released in the past, you’ll have to go on the Wii Shop channel! 

Don’t forget, mobile phones and tablets have a lot of cheap, fun games – Finally, if you have a mobile phone, particularly an iPhone, at your disposal, you already have access to a huge library of cheap (and free!) games. Tablets like the iPad are also striving to compete directly with consoles, and a short search through online stores like the App Store will yield a selection of decently-priced, high-quality games. You may even find some reasons to skip the console race entirely.

For more advice on buying a game console, visit:

So Many Game Consoles: Which to Buy? at PC World

Parents, Take Control of Your Game Console at Tucson Citizen  

Protect Your Online Reputation

Protect Your Online Reputation

Have you Googled yourself lately? It’s entirely possible you’re not doing it often enough, as a 2010 stat showed that less than 50% of folks did regularly. But chances are you’ve conducted an online search on someone else. Whether it’s a prospective employee, someone you just met or a potential business partner, looking up information on the Internet is one of the first steps many people take when trying to learn more about others.

It’s imperative you stay on top of your digital image and learn how to protect your online reputation. According to a recent infographic from KBSD Digital Marketing, 78% of recruiters check search engines on potential employees, and half of recruiters and HR professionals refer to personal websites when deciding whether or not to hire you. They’re looking at photos, trying to find unflattering or incriminating information.

So while it’s simple to suggest not to ever put any content out there that may offend others, the reality is that many of use enjoy and utilize social networks because people are sharing personal information about their thoughts and happenings.   Here are some basic tips to help you control your image while still maintaining a positive online presence, thereby ultimately protecting your online reputation:

Always Consider Your Online Footprint: Consider that everything you post or any picture that appears of you online is available for the broad public. There are many who refuse to ever have a photo taken of them holding an alcoholic drink for example. Although you can lock down Facebook privacy settings, if you’re on Twitter, be aware that anything you tweet is easily searchable, so be leery of taking any potentially controversially viewpoints or stands.

Focus on Positive Communications: Take steps to create your own brand by highlighting activities and thought leadership in areas you want to be associated with.  If you want people to see you as someone who appreciates the arts, ask questions about or post information from art gallery openings or symphony concerts. You’ll be surprised how quickly you can change others’ perceptions of you by focusing your observations and sharing on specific areas of interest.

Control Your Information: Take advantage of privacy settings wherever you can. Don’t trust Facebook, Google or any other social network or photo sharing service to have default settings exactly how you want them. If you will be posting information or sharing photos that you would never want the public at large or future employers to see, make sure to restrict access to your accounts and content.

Know What’s Out There: Google yourself, check what’s going on.  Pretend you are someone who knows nothing about you and see what kind of info it leads to. See what’s on the first few pages of search results, make sure to see what images are out there associated with a search for your name. And if you’re an individual or a small business who finds information online that you’d rather wasn’t there, consider using one of these services to help manage your online reputation:

Reputation.com offer free scans to help you find information online, with an option to subscribe for $100 a year to help them keep your reputation clean. For those that do have information they want to remove, prices to get that info removed or changed from Reputation.com will enter the thousands of dollars range, with it being even more expensive if you have a common name.

BrandYourself helps make entries you want to highlight more visible in search results than those you may want removed. As an example, the company shows how you can boost visibility for your LinkedIn and Facebook profiles (with content you control) to appear before potentially negative information, such as divorce settlement records. Brand Yourself attempts to make the process much simpler and user-based than Reputation.com, offering “do-it-yourself” tips and free profiling and alerts. The free version of the platform will help optimize up to three links and track the first page of Google search results for your name. For $10 per month, you can boost to unlimited links and track the first 10 pages of results.

Integrity Defenders helps individuals or businesses remove negative comments or content from the first page of search results of the most popular search engines like Google, Bing and Yahoo1 for a little more than $600, and even offers to push the content off the first and second pages for twice that price.